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Prettifying Up With Modern Beauty Products

The perception of beauty varies among people. Some view it as an in-depth characteristic of an individual evolving around a general description that relates to being a kind human being who is made beautiful because of her innate goodness. The vast majority however defines it in a more superficial sense as that which is visible pointing to physical appeal. In today’s world, almost everybody is influenced by the modern insight that loveliness pertains to the outside presentation. It is difficult to separate from the newest trends that support beauty enhancement. This idea has led people to resort to a number of ways in order to cope and be at reach with what society dictates as attractive.

Attempts at succeeding in the quest of becoming fine-looking are evident worldwide. The extensive boom of beauty products is proof of this. There is a variety of goods created to support each individual’s unique needs in order to fix whatever it is that one may find unpleasant in himself or herself. And because different races have diverse desires, manufacturers see to it that their items are also made available in a range of categories to fit all nations possible. An Asian woman for instance would want to have fairer skin, while a person of American descent may wish to get a tan. These varying requests are both catered to by a single company through effective creations to address these complexes.

While prettifying oneself up is an activity that everybody would perhaps want to partake in, the downside it brings is the inconvenience in getting hold of the most effective personal care products. Customers would definitely want to be thoroughly informed about the anticipated outcomes and possible reactions when using preferred merchandise and this is something that is hard to get by in most local shopping malls. It is true that most of these pieces are readily available in nearby stores but most, if not all salesgirls may not be able to respond accurately to consumer questions. Also, there might be queries regarding reviews from other users.

Because problems like those previously mentioned have long existed as a hindrance in most business dealings, many flourishing industries are already utilizing an effective marketing strategy that makes global transactions easier and more accessible to all consumers. They post product configuration details that give clients unlimited access to specific facts regarding a certain item. This way, queries are addressed precisely and without delay.

Cleopatra’s Bag of Tricks: The Love and Beauty Secrets of Antiquity’s Women

Speed dating or online matchmaking-these may be the latest romantic trends, but the artistry of love is ancient and the desire for beauty is something altogether primitive. Searching for a mate or attempting to seduce a partner was once the work of potions and charms, animal sacrifices and amulets. While many of the old rituals may seem wildly out of step for contemporary women, there are many ancient practices that may very well initiate attraction and captivate a partner today.

Asses’ milk is not a hot commodity in the present era, but once upon the time it was an elixir by which to preserve youth and beauty. Cleopatra is believed to have placed great store in asses’ milk and was known to bathe in it not only for beauty’s sake, but because it seemed to have aphrodisiac properties. Doctors of antiquity such as Hippocrates prescribed asses’ milk to treat poisonings, nose bleeds, and infectious diseases. Asses’s milk was also the preferred nourishment for nursing infants until the twentieth century. Considered closer to breast milk than that of any other animal, it was later given to infants in delicate health because it seemed to sustain them better in many cases. With its characteristic sweet taste, asses’ milk is more commonly used in France, Italy, and parts of Spain, but its health and beauty secrets can be traced back to ancient times.

History also reports that Cleopatra added salt from the Dead Sea to her bath. This is not a far-fetched tale since ancient women in this region were known to use salt and minerals from the Dead Sea medicinally and for overall health. Today’s mineral cosmetic industry, for example, owes much to the Dead Sea cosmetic practices of antiquity. It was believed that salt from the Dead Sea had restorative powers. Ten times saltier than the ocean, the Dead Sea is the lowest place on Earth that occurs naturally. The extraordinary composition of its brine and truly unique composition of its waters have been said to work wonders for people suffering from various health and skin disorders. The Bible states that King Solomon gave Dead Sea salts to the Queen of Sheba as a gift. It is also said that Marc Antony presented Cleopatra with a deed for the Dead Sea region after he conquered it.

Egyptian cosmetics are nearly as old as the civilization. Everyone from the very poor to royalty used them to varying degrees and of different quality. Women, as famously denoted by Cleopatra, wore black kohl to outline their eyes. Another eyeliner variation was to use ground green malachite. In Egypt painting the eyes was a general practice and women, no matter what their status, were likely to practice the application. To shadow the eyes, studies have revealed that ancient Egyptian women would paint their eyelids with a mixture of ground serpentine (a green mineral) and water. To paint their lips, women would combine animal fat and red ochre to create a cosmetic coating. The use of cosmetics in ancient Egypt is a testament to their ideals of beauty.

Ancient Egyptian women were also adept at perfume artistry. Cleanliness was an essential component of desirability for both sexes, but considering the climate, maintaining pleasant fragrance must have been challenging for those ancients. Nevertheless, even without soap, ancient Egyptians are revered for their perfumes. Typically oil, lime, and perfume were the preferred cleansing ingredients. Balanos oil, a botanical extract, was often chosen because it did not clash with the chosen perfume which might have been a combination of flowers and spices. Lime was also used to treat acne and oily skin.

The ancient Greeks dabbled heavily in perfumes and incense to create an aura of seduction. Burning resins or wood created pleasant fragrances that were considered enticing to lovers. Various scents were used for particular parts of the body. Roman baths contained shelves of jarred oils and powders used to perfume the body in pleasing scents. Some places were also synonymous with certain fragrances. For instance, the ancient women of Crete were known for their enchanting scents composed of lilies. Middle Eastern women were noted for their fragrance of frankincense and myrrh. Scent was intrinsic to ancient sexuality, and of course, it plays no small role today either.

Myrrh, prized as a fragrance, was also said to be used by the Queen of Sheba to entice King Solomon. Its ability to enhance seduction was widely known, but it also had many attributes as a beauty tonic. It was regularly used to repair chapped skin and prescribed to treat eczema-like rashes. It has been on beauty regimens for more than four thousand years. Similarly, frankincense was also used in perfumes, but ancient women believed it helped diminish wrinkles and slow down the aging process.

The use of skin cream composed of crushed and finally ground pearls was an ancient Chinese beauty ritual. It is said that pearl cream illuminated the skin. Even today, Chinese manufacturers add ground pearl to some creams. Pearls may seem too expensive to crush into beauty paste today, but bird droppings are essentially free. Japanese women were long accustomed to creating their own creams and cosmetics from natural elements and the droppings of nightingales, for one example, was a popular additive for face creams. And-it worked to restore beauty due to an enzyme within the droppings that contain healing properties. Also, it was far safer than the lead ancient Roman women used to whiten their faces.

In ancient India Vedic Texts reveal that turmeric, a native herb, was an especially important plant for women’s beauty regimens. The turmeric would be formed into a paste that women spread over their bodies before bathing. The skin would benefit from deep cleansing and revitalization. Historically, turmeric has been associated with increased longevity so it’s not surprising that it is still part of beauty regimens for some Asian women today who generally add sandalwood for greater antioxidant power.

Olive oil was the standard hair care product for ancient Greek women. It rejuvenated hair left damaged by the sun and added luster to the locks. Olive oil was also used soften the skin, beautify the nails, and repair chapped lips. Olive had many culinary and healthful uses for the ancients, but Grecian women prized it highly in their beauty rituals. Not surprisingly, Greece has many beauty products that contain olive oil today. Egyptians were also concerned with hair care, although wigs were commonly worn. However, both women and men rubbed the resin of fir trees into their scalps in the belief that it could generate hair growth. In ancient China, extracts from the beautiful butterfly pea, a climbing plant, was used to strengthen hair. Indian women favored coconut oil to give their hair luster and volume.

Furthermore, ornamentation was frequently added to enhance the beauty of the hair. Cleopatra, who certainly appeared to know all the beauty secrets, is said to have worn gems and jewels strewn through her hair. Women of other ancient cultures wore carved combs or natural elements like shells in their hair. Hairstyles could also be elaborate as depicted on Egyptian scrolls or other ancient texts. In many cultures, a thick and healthy head of hair was linked to a woman’s overall healthy and fertility.

The use of aphrodisiacs appears in nearly all cultures. Some edibles were believed to enhance women’s sexuality or increase their fertility. Ginseng, horny goat weed, and vanilla were frequently used by women of many ancient cultures. One ancient aphrodisiac is of particular note, however. The seeds of the fenugreek plant were used eaten by Egyptian, Roman, and Greek women in the belief that it increased the size of their breasts. These ancient women also believed that the plant could round their breasts to a more pleasing form. Many aphrodisiacs associated with women were believed to make them more receptive and excited about sex.

Women of Morocco, Egypt, and Persia found that jasmine was an extraordinary aphrodisiac. Bathing in a jasmine scented bath was known to relieve stress and anger. Women scented with jasmine were said to arouse great passion in men. Jasmine was also used to treat dry or sensitive skin. While not as heady, rose oil is said to be a similar type of aphrodisiac regarded by the ancients. Women hailed its calming affects. Rose oil was also used for skin care. Ancient women of Rome were known to favor lavender-scented baths.

While many seduction and beauty rituals of the ancients are considered obsolete today, there are surprising similarities between the past and the present. Favored scents, cosmetic needs, matters of seduction are all components of contemporary sexuality just as they were for the ancients. Skin care, hair care, and many other beauty rituals were important aspects of women’s lives in antiquity just as they are today. Beauty and sexuality often went hand in hand for the ancients; these aspects are at the heart of present-day civilization too.

Natural Beauty Advice – The Truth About Natural Ingredients

These days, most skincare and bath and body lines boast of natural plant extracts in their beauty products.

Supermarket shelves are packed with beauty products that contain alove vera, chamomile, lavender and other common plant extracts.

Luxury beauty brands boast of plant extracts from less known sources like crowberry as well as expensive ingredients like caviar extracts and rose essential oil. Some go so far as to use only organic plant extracts and forgo synthetics altogether.

Then there are the mid-range beauty brands that use a wider range of plant extracts but avoid the prohibitively expensive items. They may be green companies that care for the environment and avoid animal testing altogether. They may even have organic ingredients at still affordable prices.

The common denominator is that the focus on natural ingredients.

In ancient times up to the invention of modern cosmetics, beauty was derived from nature. Flowers, herbs, clay, vegetable oils, honey and beeswax are common ingredients in home made beauty products. The problem with these home made concoctions is that they cannot keep. Bacteria and mould breed happily in these nourishing creams and face packs. You have to use them immediately and they do not have the shelf life necessary to make them commercially viable. Leave them out too long before you use them and you can get a nasty rash, outbreak of acne from the mould or bacteria that has proliferated in your beauty treat.

Along came petroleum by products. While in the past, vegetable oils which go rancid with time, were used to make creams and lotions, we now have cheap synthetic oils that do not go bad.These form the base of moisturizers and other beauty products for the mass market. On top of that, modern science has provided us with a myriad of cheap synthetic preservatives that inhibit bacterial growth and fungal growth. Now beauty products can be left on the shelf for years, hence the modern cosmetic industry was born.

Modern science has developed new molecules that can deliver active ingredients deeper into the skin, isolated chemicals that can help the skin regenerate itself and do so many modern miracles in the beauty arena.No doubt, the starting point is some discovery in nature, like a herb with some medical property. The labs would then isolate the chemical responsible for that effect and duplicate it synthetically, or just extract it straight from the source and patent that chemical for that sole use in that cosmetic house’s products.

Then why are natural ingredients so popular?

For one thing, some of the synthetics, especially the petroleum by-products clog up skin pores leading to acne outbreaks. Artificial colors and scents and many of these chemicals can irritate sensitive skin. Some people find that natural skincare which do not contain the particular offending synthetics give them less problems.

Also, even the beauty products that have lab extracted components of herbs, plants and natural ingredients give credit back to nature, telling you what plants, herbs and other sources the active ingredients came from, so in a sense, these too can be considered having natural ingredients

Not all natural skincare is equal. A jar of aloe vera cream from one brand may contain 1% aloe vera while a tube of aloe vera gel form another brand may contain 99.7% aloe vera. Both are labelled aloe vera products since they do contain aloe vera. Look at the list of the ingredients. The ones listed on top of the list are what this product is made mostly of. The ones at the end of the list make up the smallest percentage of the product.

Clarins skincare products typically contain as much as 30% plant extracts as compared to 10% in most good skincare lines. Clarins uses interesting plants in their beauty products. For example, Clarins super restorative skincare range [http://www.getyouthful.com/superrestorative.htm] contains pueraria lobata, an Asian plant known as forever young, which deals with the effect the loss of hormones has on aging skin.